Shiny New Books 8 is now out. As usual, it features an eclectic range of book reviews both fiction and non-fiction, including my take on the fourth Paul Dark espionage novel. There’s also my guide to the fiction of Manchester. But don’t let that put you off – there’s lots of stuff here to whet the appetite of the most jaded reader. I was intrigued by Eleanor Franzen’s review of Jeanette Winterson’s The Gap of Time, the first in a series in which contemporary novelists present their versions of Shakespeare plays. I look forward to Howard Jacobson’s Merchant of Venice. In Bitter Chill looks like the start of a promising crime fiction career, and a new novel by Umberto Eco is always an event.

In non-fiction, Neurotribes, about Autism, seems to be a compelling read, and Barbara Howard makes a good case for yet another biography of Charlotte Brontë. In the reprints section, interesting to see that the small independent press Daunt has reissued John Collier’s quirky 1930 novel His Monkey Wife.
So, lots to read and enjoy at SNB. Have a browse!

CC BY-SA 4.0 Shiny New Books by Dr Rob Spence is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.